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Chemical safety : emergency response community views on the adequacy of federally required chemical information, 2002

by United States. Congress.
Series: Fire Service Dissertations and Theses Collection.Publisher: [Washington, D.C.] : U.S. General Accounting Office, [2002]Description: 1 online resource (26 p.).Other title: Emergency response community views on the adequacy of federally required chemical information.Subject(s): Chemicals | Chemical industry | Hazardous substances | Disaster communicationOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: The local emergency responders and representatives from national organizations we contacted have varied views on the adequacy of (1) information in chemical inventory forms and risk management plans and (2) the manner in which that information is delivered. Local responders in most of the communities we contacted believe this information generally meets their needs, but a few said that it was not adequate to help them respond to chemical incidents; representatives of the national organizations were divided in their opinions on the adequacy of the information as well. Both local responders and national organization representatives made suggestions that they believe would improve the usefulness of the information.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due
E-Resource IFSI Library
Online Resource
Available

Title from title screen (viewed on Sept. 27, 2003).
"July 2002."
"Report to Congressional committees.
"GAO-02-799."
Paper version available from: General Accounting Office, 441 G St., NW, Rm. LM, Washington, D.C. 20548.
Includes bibliographical references.

The local emergency responders and representatives from national organizations we contacted have varied views on the adequacy of (1) information in chemical inventory forms and risk management plans and (2) the manner in which that information is delivered. Local responders in most of the communities we contacted believe this information generally meets their needs, but a few said that it was not adequate to help them respond to chemical incidents; representatives of the national organizations were divided in their opinions on the adequacy of the information as well. Both local responders and national organization
representatives made suggestions that they believe would improve the usefulness of the information.

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